Family Dollar Dollar Tree Merger Agreement

Dollar Tree and Family Dollar have agreed to sell 330 family dollar transactions to settle a complaint that their proposed merger would likely be anti-competitive, the Federal Trade Commission said Thursday. When Leon Levine retired in 2003, his son Howard R. Levine followed him as president and CEO and kept this multi-billion dollar business in the family. CAUTION AGAINST FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS: Our press release contains “forward-looking statements” about how this term is used in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements refer to future events, developments or results and generally use words such as belief, anticipation, expectation, intent, planning, forecasting or estimation. Our forward-looking statements include, for example, statements relating to the merger with Family Dollar, including the benefits, results and effects of the merger, future financial and operating results, including estimated synergies, expectations regarding the combined company`s plans, objectives, expectations (financial or otherwise) and intentions. Risks and uncertainties associated with the proposed merger include, but are not limited to, difficulties related to the integration of the proposed merger and our ability to realize the savings and synergies contemplated by the merger, unexpected costs, fees or expenses resulting from the proposed merger, and the outcome of ongoing or potential litigation or administrative investigations. Dollar General has more rural locations and aims to attract low-income buyers by selling frequently purchased products at different prices. Family Dollar aims to attract similar low-income shoppers, but nearly half of its businesses are located in urban areas. Including dollar family stores, Dollar Tree has approximately 15,000 U.S. stores, which roughly corresponds to dollar General`s. On July 28, 2014, Dollar Tree announced that it would acquire Family Dollar for $US 74.50 per share, a deal that values Family Dollar at $8.5 billion, and that Dollar Tree would also assume $1 billion in debt, currently owed by Family Dollar, for a total of $9.5 billion. [4] [23] Bob Sasser, CEO of Dollar Tree, said Family Dollar CEO Howard R.

Levine will remain with the company after the merger and will be appointed to Dollar Tree`s board of directors. [5] Dollar General entered the Offer shortly thereafter and exceeded Dollar Tree`s Offer on August 18, 2014,[24] $78.50 per share compared to Dollar Tree`s offer of $74.50 per share. The enterprise value of the general offer of $9.7 billion compared to the Dollar Tree`s $9.2 billion, while the quantum return for shareholders varied due to fluctuations in stock prices and cash-deals of competing stocks. . . .