Song Lyrics With Subject Verb Agreement

Learners are asked to look for grammatical errors in texts. You have time to find it without the help of the teacher. They do it individually or in pairs. If they don`t find the mistakes, the teacher can tell them the line in which the error is, but learners should try to identify the problem. To check their answers. The video is great because the students like to see 5 people playing a guitar, there are not many great distractions of the words and the song is not too fast. The answer key is included, but for the second part, the answers may differ a little from the student depending on the sentence leg. To get to the more practical part of this article, here are some common grammatical errors in English songs that are demonstrated on lyrics of some songs. Mistakes are always pointed out. I use it for my TOEFL class when we are working on the subject/verb agreement (verbs are in the present and past).

I don`t teach vocabulary because I want them to get used to making sense of context or realizing that to answer questions, you don`t have to know every word in the sentence. It is a basic worksheet on which students try to find errors in a text (in this case song lyrics). Ideally, they do this themselves first, then they check their answers with a partner and learners receive excerpts of texts that contain errors, and the procedure is the same as in phases 3 and 4. The subject-verb agreement is part of the basic knowledge of English; Nevertheless, it is also one of the most common things where learners make mistakes, especially when it comes to the “s” form in the singular third person that they often forget. The missing “-s” is a common phenomenon in songs, usually due to the number of syllables required for a line. Other problems are the use of the plural form instead of the singular or the omission of the subject – although it is easy to see in the context that is the subject, it should nevertheless be physically present in the sentence. “Boyfriend” by Justin Bieber If I were your friend, I would treat you well* * In this line, there is also a mistake to substitute the adjective “good” for the adverb “good”. Are you already looking for errors in the texts or is this the first time you have focused on them? If you`re trying to say something or write something, do you think of a song and say it or write it like in the song? Do you think it`s dangerous to rely on grammar in songs? Do you think these exercises (which we did together) will help you in some way? Do you think from now on, you will notice mistakes in the songs or try to notice them? A discussion about the presence of errors in songs should always be part of the teaching, either before or after using the songs…